RRISK

The RRISK program reduces the risk of young driver car crashes by 44%

The RRISK program reduces the risk of young driver car crashes by 44%New research, published in Pediatrics, November, 2009 investigating the benefits of young driver education has shown that young drivers who attended the RRISK program had a 44% reduced risk of a car crashes. The research compared the impact of 2 school based programs on traffic infringements and crashes for young drivers. RRISK, described as a ‘resilience building’ program by the researchers, is the first and only school based educational program to have resulted in a reduction in road crashes. Those who attended the other ‘driver focused’ program had no reduction in crashes.

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19.10.09

Young People and Risk Taking

Young People and Risk TakingRisk-taking in adolescence is not only normal, it is an essential part of learning and personal development. Every healthy adolescent takes risks as he or she grows towards independence. Most researchers agree that if there is no risk there is no growth. A common problem for some young people is their inability to evaluate the potential risks and consequences of everyday behaviour. Thrill seeking, speeding, the desire to impress one's friends, feelings of invincibility and the search for new experiences are all motivating forces that drive many teenagers. As a result they are over represented in every category of risk taking resulting in injury and trauma.

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09.09.11

Adolescent Drinking Behaviour

Adolescent Drinking BehaviourYoung people aged 16-24 are amongst the heaviest drinkers in Australian society. In NSW, 50% of males and 37% of females in this age group drink more than 2 standard drinks per day which is the low risk level recommended in the Australian Alcohol Guidelines. (NSW Population Health Survey 2009)

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09.09.11

Parties - Will You Allow Alcohol at Your Adolescent’s Party?

Parties - Will You Allow Alcohol at Your Adolescent's Party?Many parents and carers will be helping young people in their family celebrate birthdays, special occasions, finishing their school year or leaving school. It is time for careful planning so that everyone enjoys themselves. Some parents may not be aware of their responsibilities in relation to supplying alcohol to under 18's.

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09.09.11

Talking to Young People about Alcohol and Drugs

Talking to Young People about Alcohol and DrugsIt is best for education about alcohol and drugs to begin before young people are exposed to personal decisions about their use. Young people who have accurate information, coping and decision making skills and understand the issues, will be in a good position to make responsible decisions about alcohol and drugs.

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09.09.11

Australian Alcohol Guideline for Children and young people under 18 years of age

Australian Alcohol Guideline for Children and young people under 18 years of ageNot drinking alcohol is the safest option. For children under 15 Parents and carers should be advised that children under 15 years of age are at the greatest risk of harm from drinking and that for this age group, not drinking is especially important.
For Young people aged 15-18 years The safest option is to delay the initiation of drinking for as long as possible

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09.09.11

Young Drivers Aged 17 – 25 Years Why Are They ‘At Risk’?

Young Drivers Aged 17 – 25 Years Why Are They 'At Risk'?Driver inexperience: Often young drivers don't realise that it takes time and lots of practice to develop safe driving skills. Developing brain: Parts of the brain responsible for self control and for recognising and managing hazards do not fully mature until after the teenage years, so young drivers are more likely to experiment and take dangerous risks.

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09.09.11

Driving Test and Provisional Driver Restrictions as of July 1, 2007

A summary of the changes to the driving test and provisional driver restrictions are highlighted below. Please contact the RTA on: 13 22 13 if you require more detailed information.



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01.07.09

Drugs, Driving and Roadside Drug Testing

Driving under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs impairs driving skills. A zero blood alcohol limit applies to all L, P1 and P2 licence holders. This means NO ALCOHOL before driving. Any driver, motorcycle rider or supervising licence holder may be required to undertake roadside testing for the presence of alcohol and/or illicit drugs.

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09.09.11

Tips for Supervising a Learner Driver

Safe driving takes time and practice – it is more than just operating a vehicle. • Use the 120 supervised hours to help young drivers learn to recognise and respond safely to hazards.
• Plan a variety of driving experiences eg, different road conditions, weather conditionsand vary time of day.
• Shorter drives can be useful early on.

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09.09.11

Tips for Supervising a Provisional Driver

Safe driving takes time and practice – it is more than just operating a vehicle. • Ensuring they organise their time so they can stick to posted speed limits and adapt to driving conditions, such as rain.
• Get them to plan their night before they leave. For L and P1 drivers, mobile phone use is prohibited, even hands-free or loudspeaker.
• Slowly increasing the amount of independent night driving – this is a time when young drivers are more likely to crash.

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09.09.11

Points to Consider When Buying a Used Car

Know what type of vehicle is allowed. The prohibited vehicle condition restricts provisional (P1 and P2) drivers from driving certain high performance vehicles.
Prohibited vehicles are those with:
• Eight or more cylinders (except diesel).
• A turbocharged engine (diesel exempt).
• A supercharged engine (diesel exempt).
• Engine performance modifications that require an engineer's certificate.
• Certain high performance six cylinder engines. Visit the P1/P2 – High performance vehicle restrictions page on www.rta.com.au

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09.09.11